Ana tree


Ana tree - Photo by CDKNetwork

Ana tree is a thorny tree that is used in Africa for nitrogen fixation and erosion control. The wood is used to make canoes, mortars and pestles. The pods are used as a fodder for livestock.

Ana tree is a legume and can reach a height of 6 to 30 meters. It is very resistant to drought.

Names

Scientific
   Faidherbia albida
Synonym
   Acacia albida
English
   Ana tree
   Apple-ring acacia
   Balanzan tree
   Winter thorn
Dutch
   Ana boom
   Appel-ring acacia
   Winter doorn
Spanish
   Espina de invierno
French
   Balanzan
German
   Anabaum
Other
   Ana

Taxonomy

Genus
   Faidherbia
Family
   Fabaceae
Order
   Fabales

Basic information and facts

Origin:

Africa and the Middle East

Distribution:

Africa and the Middle East

Evergreen or deciduous:

It is a deciduous tree with leaves present during the dry season, while it sheds its leaves in the rainy season.

Flowers:

Flowers of the Ana tree provide bee forage at the end of the rainy season.

Leaves:

The leaves are rich in nitrogen, and can be added to the soil as a natural fertilizer which can increase crop yields (e.g. maize).

Climate and weather:

Tropical savanna climate with wet and dry season.

Height:

The trees can be 6 to 30 meters tall.

Uses:

The trees are grown because they are legumes which can fix nitrogen. Leaves are added to soil as a natural fertilizer. Pods are used as fodder for livestock. The wood is used to make canoes, mortars, pestles, etc.
Ana trees can be planted between field crops because they shed their leaves during the rainy season and thus they don’t block the sunlight.

Crop categories

Forage and fodder crops
Green manures
Timber
Tropical crops
Legumes

Pictures


Ana tree - Photo by CDKNetwork


"Faidherbia albida" by Marco Schmidt -
Own work (own foto).
Licensed under CC BY-SA 2.5 via Wikimedia Commons


"Faidherbia albida branch"
by http://edcintl.cr.usgs.gov/senegal2/veg1.html.
Licensed under Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons


"Faidherbia albida flower"
by Roger Culos - Own work.
Licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons

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