Mangosteen


Mangosteen

Mangosteen originates from the Sunda Islands and the Moluccas.

Mangosteen fruits are eaten fresh. After removing the skin, the bright white flesh can be eaten. It is one of the most tasty tropical fruits.

Mangosteen is sometimes called the Queen of Fruits.

Names

Scientific
   Garcinia mangostana
English
   Mangosteen
   Purple Mangosteen
Dutch
   Mangestang
   Mangistan
   Mangoestan
   Mangostan
   Mangosteen
Spanish
   Jobo de la India
   Mangostino
French
   Mangoustan
   Mangoustanier
   Mangouste
German
   Mangostan
   Mangostanbaum
   Mangostane
   Mangostanfrucht
   Mangostin
   Mangostinbaum
Italian
   Mangostano

Taxonomy

Genus
   Garcinia
Family
   Clusiaceae
Order
   Malpighiales

Basic information and facts

Origin:

The Sunda Islands and the Moluccas

Distribution:

Mangosteen was first domesticated in Thailand or Burma. Its main distribution now includes Thailand, Cambodia, Vietnam, Burma, Malaysia and Singapore. Also grown but to less extent in parts of Sri Lanka, India, Philippines, some places in Africa (i.e. Zanzibar, Ghana), the Carribean, and South America

Evergreen or deciduous:

Evergreen tree.

Fruits:

The mangosteen fruit has a deep purplish peel. Inside is a succulent
white pulp consisting of 4 to 8 segments and one to five seeds. The pulp has a sensational flavor which is probably the reason that it is called “queen of fruits”.

Leaves:

Short thick leathery evergreen leaves.

Trunk:

The bark of the mangosteen tree has a dark brown (nearly black) color.

Climate and weather:

Mangosteen requires a tropical climate. It cannot tolerate temperature below 5°C.

Pollination:

Seeds of mangosteen grow without sexual fertilization.

Height:

7-25 meter.

Crown:

The mangosteen tree has a crown with a pyramidal shape.

Type of soil:

Prefers deep, rich organic soil, especially sandy loam or laterite.

Growth rate:

Slow growing. In Thailand, the tree is said to take at least 12 years to fruit

Spacing (close range)

10 meter

Spacing (wide range)

12 meter

Propagation:

The so-called “seeds” are not true seeds but embryos that start growing without sexual fertilization. The reproduction process is thus vegetative, which means that there is very little variation in the resulting trees and their fruits.

Insect pests:

Usually no serious pests.

Diseases:

Usually no serious diseases.

Other problems:

Mangosteen can suffer from a physiological problem called “gamboge”. Latex is oozing onto the outer surface of the fruits and on the branches during periods of heavy rain. This does not affect the eating quality of the fruit, but because it affects appearance of the fruits it may result in lowering the economic value of the harvest.

Harvesting:

Harvest the fruits by hand from ladders or with a cutting pole, but don’t allow fruits to fall on the ground. Ripeness can be determined from the full development of color and slight softening of the fruits. Fruits must be fully mature (developed) before picking otherwise they will not ripen. In Thailand harvesting starts in May and continues through the rainy season.

Uses:

Eat as a hand fruit. Cut the skin half way and open the fruit. The spoon out the white pulp.

Proverbs and Quotes

  • Mangosteen is the Queen of Fruits.
  • Imagine the best peach you’ve ever eaten, combined with a touch of passion fruit, a sliver of nectarine and a nip of lychee. Imagine a concord grape’s sweet purple essence giving way to the clean leanness of a Granny Smith. Add a squeeze of lime, and a spoon of buttery brown sugar. Stir. (Jarrett Wrisley)

Recipes

No mangosteen recipe yet.

Crop categories

Fruits
Food crops
Tropical crops

Pictures


Mangosteen


Mangosteen


Mangosteen


Mangosteen tree


Mangosteen by Berthe Hoola van Nooten (1817-1892),
Pieter De Pannemaeker (lithographer)
[Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

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